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Thursday, March 21, 2013

Fool Says There Is No God


Psalm 14

For the director of music. Of David.

1 The foola says in his heart,           
“There is no God.”

They are corrupt, their deeds are vile;
there is no one who does good.

2The Lord looks down from heaven
on all mankind
to see if there are any who understand,
any who seek God.

3 All have turned away, all have become corrupt;
there is no one who does good,
not even one.

4Do all these evildoers know nothing?
They devour my people as though eating bread;
they never call on the Lord.
5But there they are, overwhelmed with dread,
for God is present in the company of the righteous.
6You evildoers frustrate the plans of the poor,
but the Lord is their refuge.

7 Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion!
When the Lord restores His people,
let Jacob rejoice and Israel be glad!


Psalm 14

It does not appear upon what occasion this Psalm was penned. Some say David penned it when Saul persecuted him; others, when Absalom rebelled against him. But they are mere conjectures, which have not certainty enough to warrant us to expound the psalm by them.

The apostle Paul, in quoting part of this Psalm (Romans 3:10, etc.) to prove that Jews and Gentiles are all under sin (v. 9) and that all the world is guilty before God (v. 19), leads us to understand it, in general, as a description of the depravity of human nature, the sinfulness of the sin we are conceived and born in, and the deplorable corruption of a great part of mankind, even of the world that lies in wickedness, 1 John 5:19.

In all the Psalms from the 3rd to this (except the 8th) David had been complaining of those that hated and persecuted him, insulted him and abused him; now here he traces all those bitter streams to the fountain, the general corruption of nature, and sees that not his enemies only, but all the children of men, were thus corrupted.

But our remedy can be discovered in Christ completely when He returns to Zion.

"Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion!
When the Lord restores His people,
let Jacob rejoice and Israel be glad!"

Here is,

I. A charge exhibited against a wicked world (v. 1).

II. The proof of the charge (v. 2, 3).

III. A serious expostulation with sinners, especially with persecutors, upon it (v. 4-6).

IV. A believing prayer for the salvation of Israel and a joyful expectation of it (v. 7).

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