Translate

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Jesus Gave Up His Spirit


Matthew 27:45-56 NIV

The Death of Jesus

45From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. 46About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, 

“Eli, Eli, lemasabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have You forsaken Me?”).

47When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”
48Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. 49The rest said, “Now leave Him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save Him.”

50 And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, He gave up His Spirit.
51At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth shook, the rocks split 52and the tombs broke open. The bodies of many holy people who had died were raised to life. 53They came out of the tombs after Jesus’ resurrection ande went into the holy city and appeared to many people.

54When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed,

“Surely He was the Son of God!”

55Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for His needs. 56Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joseph,f and the mother of Zebedee’s sons.



27:45-50

During the three hours which the darkness continued, Jesus was in agony, wrestling with the powers of darkness, and suffering His Father's displeasure against the sin of man, for which He was now making His soul an offering. Never were there three such hours since the day God created man upon the earth, never such a dark and awful scene; it was the turning point of that great affair, man's redemption and salvation.

Jesus uttered a complaint from Psalm 22:1;

“My God, my God, why have You forsaken Me?” 


Here He teaches of what use the Word of God is to direct us in prayer, and recommends the use of Scripture expressions in prayer. The believer may have tasted some drops of bitterness, but he can only form a very feeble idea of the greatness of Christ's sufferings. Yet, hence he learns something of the Savior's love to sinners; hence he gets deeper conviction of the evil of sin, and of what he owes to Christ, Who delivers him from the wrath to come.

His enemies wickedly ridiculed His complaint. Many of the reproaches cast upon the word of God and the people of God, arise, as here, from gross mistakes. Christ, just before He gave up His Spirit, spoke in His full strength, to show that His life was not forced from Him, but was freely delivered into His Father's Hands. He had strength to bid defiance to the powers of death: and to show that by the eternal Spirit He offered Himself, being the Priest as well as the Sacrifice, He cried with a loud voice. Then He gave up the Spirit.

The Son of God upon the cross, did die by the violence of the pain He was put to. His soul was separated from His body, and so His body was left really and truly dead. It was certain that Christ did die, for it was needful that He should die. He had undertaken to make Himself an offering for sin, and He did it when He willingly gave up His life.


27:51-56 

The rending of the veil signified that Christ, by his death, opened a way to God. We have an open way through Christ to the throne of grace, or mercy-seat now, and to the Throne of glory hereafter.  The graves were opened, and many bodies of saints which slept, arose. To whom they appeared, in what manner, and how they disappeared, we are not told; and we must not desire to be wise above what is written. 

The dreadful appearances of God in His providence, sometimes work strangely for the conviction and awakening of sinners. This was expressed in the terror that fell upon the centurion and the Roman soldiers. Never were the horrid nature and effects of sin so tremendously displayed, as on that day when the Beloved Son of the Father hung upon the cross, suffering for sin, the Just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God.

No comments:

Post a Comment